Village Descriptions

Puyallup-Tacoma section

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. eel-AHL-koh ('striped water',  possibly from the striped appearance of the river below the confluence before the waters merged). Muckleshoot. At the historic confluence of the White and Green Rivers at the present-day town of Auburn. In mid-1800s there were located here "...about 17 buildings...on an average...each building would be about 36 by 60 feet." The people living here were known as the skwah-PAHBSH or Green ('fluctuating') River people.  (1, 2, 3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. SOOS. Muckleshoot. At the mouth of Suice Creek on the Green River. In mid-1800s there were located here "...two buildings...about 36 by 60 feet." The people living here were known as the skwah-PAHBSH or Green ('fluctuating') River people.  (2, 3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. ts’koh-KAH-beed. Muckleshoot. On the Green River about 4 miles E of present-day town of Auburn at the bend now spanned by the highway bridge. In mid-1800s there were "...two buildings..." located here. The people living here were known as the skwah-PAHBSH or Green ('fluctuating') River people.  (2, 3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. kee-AHTS. Muckleshoot. On the Green River not far upstream from village 45 at a place "...now [1927] known as Mike Burns Creek." In mid-1800s there was one large building here. The people living here were known as the skwah-PAHBSH or Green ('fluctuating') River people.  (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. SHOOK-seed. Muckleshoot. On the Green River not far upstream from village 46. In mid-1800s there were "...three...buildings..." here. The people living here were known as the skwah-PAHBSH or Green ('fluctuating') River people.  (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. noo-WAHK-um. Muckleshoot. On the Green River at the mouth of Newaukum Creek. In the mid-1800s there was one large building here. The people living here were known as the skwah-PAHBSH or Green ('fluctuating') River people.  (2, 3)  Further upriver from this location was the old and important village of tsuhk-w'TSKEH-bahts, 'where the [edible plant known as the] fossil fern is found'.  (1)  

 

 

 

 

 

 

7. sbahl’wh-koh-AHBSH. Muckleshoot. On the White River near a small stream at the SE corner of the present Muckleshoot reservation.  (3)  On the river near this location, where Indian Dan lived in the early 1900s, was the old village of DEHKH.  (1)   

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. [name not known]. Muckleshoot. On the White River at the mouth of Boise Creek. In the mid-1800s there was "one large building" here.  (2, 3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9. spwee-YAWL-ah-pahbsh (from pwee-YAWL-ahp, 'twisting', referring to the name of the river, although according to (1) the word means 'ample supply of everything'). Puyallup. Located at the mouth of the Puyallup River in what is now the city of Tacoma, at the current intersection of 15th Street and Pacific Avenue. This was the central site of an extended village which included TWAH-deb-tsahb, village 10, as well as two other nearby house sites, 11 and 12. People of this village were the "real" Puyallup.  (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

10. TWAH-deb-tsahb. Puyallup. Located in what is now the city of Tacoma where a creek, which no longer exists, emptied into Commencement Bay, at the current intersection of 24th Street and Pacific Avenue. This, along with villages 9, 11 and 12, was part of the extended village spwee-YAWL-ah-pahbsh.  (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

11. TSAHTS-kahd (‘main village’). Puyallup. Located in the present-day city of Tacoma where Clay Creek empties into the Puyallup River not far from the old Cushman School. This, along with villages 9, 10 and 12, was part of the extended village spwee-YAWL-ah-pahbsh.  (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

12. kahl-KAHL-awk. Puyallup. Located in the present-day town of Fife at the former mouth of Wapato Creek, just above the grasslands. This, along with villages 9, 10 and 11, was part of the extended village spwee-YAWL-ah-pahbsh.  (3)

 

 

 

 

 

13. s’HAWHT’l-ahbch (from HAWHT’l, the name of present-day Hylebos Waterway).  Puyallup.  Located in present-day NE Tacoma near where Hybelos Waterway empties into Commencement Bay. People from this village were said to have moved across the Sound to establish a village at present-day Gig Harbor, TWAH-well-kawh. Silver salmon were plentiful in Hylebos Waterway.  (3)

 

 

 

 

 

14. [name not known]. Puyallup. Located at fork of Clover Creek about 3 miles E of present-day town of Brookdale. The people here were called t’STEHL-eh-kuhb-ahbsh after the name of their principal village at the present-day town of Steilacoom. There may have been another allied village at present-day town of Spanaway. The people at this site had strong ties with the Nisqually as well as with tsuhk-WEHK-wahbsh, village 15.  (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

15. tsuhk-WEHK-wahbsh (from suhk-WEHK’oo, the name for Clarks Creek). Puyallup. Located where Clarks Creek emptied into the Puyallup River. In addition to contacts up and down the Puyallup River, this village had strong ties with village 14.  (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

16. SKWAHD-ahbsh (from KWAHD, the name for Simons (?) Creek). Puyallup. Located on Wapato Creek at the mouth of Simons (?) Creek.  (3)

 

 

 

 

 

17. STUH’kh-ahbsh ( from STUH’kh ‘that which has been cut through’, the name for Stuck River). Puyallup. Located where the Stuck River enters the Puyallup River. In the mid-1800s there were "two buildings" here each about 30’x30’. At one time this river flowed down the present Wapato Creek bed, when the river changed its course the village moved with it to its new junction with the Puyallup River. In myth, this event was connected to the movement of an immense animal which "cut through" the land in an effort to reach the Sound. This village had strong ties with the White River Muckleshoot.  (2, 3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

18. KWUHSP'l ('trout'). Puyallup. On the Puyallup River near present-day town of Alderton. In the mid-1800s this was the site of one house "...30’x50’...it was Tommy Lane’s home [Puyallup chief c.1900]...his ancestors’ home."  (1, 2, 3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

19. tsoo-WAHD-ee-ahbsh (from tsoo-WAH, the name for the Puyallup River above its junction with the Carbon River. The name was said to derive from the cry uttered by an insane woman who left her people and was occasionally seen by the river’s banks; another story has the woman being kidnapped by Sasquatch-like wild people said to prowl this area at night). Puyallup. Located on the present-day Puyallup River just above its junction with the Carbon River on an almost treeless prairie. In mid-1800's this site had "one house 30’x40’ built of logs...[and on a] little prairie land about 8 houses 25’ square...maybe four families each." This village had strong Nisqually ties.  (1, 2, 3)

 

 

 

 

 

20. too-WHAHK-hahbsh (from too-WHAHK, the name of the present-day Carbon River). Puyallup. In mid-1800s this site had "one building 100’x60’...also one square building 30’x30’". Early white researchers applied the name of this village to all the inland people of the upper Puyallup drainage, as opposed to the salt water groups around Tacoma.  (2, 3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

21. [name not known]. Puyallup. Located at the mouth of S Prairie Creek where it empties into the Carbon River. In mid-1800s this site had "one building...about 80’x50’".  (2, 3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

22. doh-LHEE-ook’oo. Muckleshoot. Located near present-day town of South Prairie on S Prairie Creek at the mouth of Cole Creek. In mid-1800s this site had "[one] house about 40’x50’". This village had strong ties with eel-AHL-koh, village 1, whose people came here every year for salmon fishing. This village moved to the Muckleshoot Reservation at the time of concentration.  (2, 3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

23. buhts-AHL-ahbsh. Nisqually. Located on Mashel River on a highland below present-day town of Eatonville. Sahaptin as well as Salish was spoken at this village which had strong ties to the groups on the E side of the Cascade Mountains. Leschi, who organized an uprising against settlers of the Puget Sound country was from this village.  (2, 3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.  "Puget Sound Geography" by T. T. Waterman.  Washington DC:  National Anthropological Archives, mss. 

2.  Duwamish et al vs. United States of America, F-275.  Washington DC:  US Court of Claims, 1927.

3.  The Puyallup-Nisqually by Marian W. Smith.  New York:  Columbia University Press, 1940.