Village Descriptions

Klallam-Port Townsend section

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1. TSAHLh-met. S’Klallam. On the Strait of Juan de Fuca at the mouth of Moore’s [Morse] Creek.  (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

2. TSAW'kw. S’Klallam. On Dungeness Bay at Old Town, across mouth of Dungeness River from steh-TEH-lhem (village 3).  (1, 2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. steh-TEH-lhem. S’Klallam. Outside Dungeness Bay near present town of Dungeness, at east side of mouth of Dungeness River.  Two very large houses.  (1, 2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

4. nuh-nee-uh-AW-uhlch ('grand firs'). S’Klallam. On the Strait of Juan de Fuca near present town of Jamestown.  (2)   

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5. shkwee-UHN. S’Klallam. At mouth of Sequim Bay near present town of Port Washington.  (1, 2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. kah-KWEE'tl. S’Klallam. In Discovery Bay at Port Discovery.  (1)  Or, alternatively, near present-day Diamond Point at mouth of Discovery Bay.  (2)

 

 

 

 

 

 

7. [name not known]. Chimakum. At present town of Port Townsend. One of two principal villages of this group.  (1)  Another source reports only one bona fide Chimakum village--TSEE-tsah-boos.  It was about 8 miles S of Port Townsend near the present-day town of Hadlock at the head of Hadlock Bay.  The quarrelsome Chimakum surrounded this village with a stockade.  (3)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. [name not known]. Chimakum. At present town of Port Ludlow. One of two principal villages of this group.  (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

9. [name not known]. Chimakum (possibly post-contact). Near present town of Port Gamble, across the bay from the mill.  (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10. TAH-boo’wh. Twana. On Long Spit near the head of Dabop Bay. Residents here were an independent Twana-speaking group known as chtuh-TAH-boo’wh. Village abandoned before 1870.  (4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

11. kwull-SEED. Skokomish. On a beach near the head of Quilcene Bay between the mouth of Little Quilcene River and Donovan Creek. People here were called kwull-SEE-duh-buhsh; they spoke a Skokomish dialect but were considered by most Skokomish to be "...a little bit different...savages...bad people."  (4)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

12. [name not known]. Suquamish. Near the mouth of Liberty Bay above the present town of Poulsbo. "One or two large buildings, about 4 smaller ones" reported here probably in mid-late 1800s.  (1, 5)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

13. [name uncertain]. Lower Skagit. Whidbey Island at Oak Harbor on Maylor Point. Old and very large village which might have originally been the source for the name "Skagit".  (1, 6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

14. [name not known]. Lower Skagit. Whidbey Island on upper end of Penn Cove near Monroe’s Landing. Old cemetery here as well. Penn Cove was heavily populated and a primary resource area for horse clams, mussels, sole, flounder and cockles.  (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

15. no-BAHKS. Lower Skagit. Whidbey Island on upper end of Penn Cove, just west of present town of San de Fuca. Penn Cove was heavily populated and a primary resource area for horse clams, mussels, sole, flounder and cockles.  (1, 6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

16. bah-TSAHD-ah-lee (‘snake place’). Lower Skagit. Whidbey Island at site of present town of Coupeville. This was location of largest village of the Lower Skagits. Penn Cove was heavily populated and a primary resource area for horse clams, mussels, sole, flounder and cockles.  (1, 6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

17. BAH-uh-sahts. Lower Skagit. Whidbey Island between present town of Coupeville and Long Point.  (1, 6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

18. tsoo-BAH-awl-tsed. Lower Skagit. Whidbey Island, on the N side of Snaklem Point, about 4 miles east of Coupeville.  This village was located near a prairie-like area where deer were hunted, and berries, bulbs and flax were gathered for food, spiritual and medicinal purposes.  (1, 6)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

19. [name not known]. Lower Skagit (pre-contact only). Whidbey Island near present town of Greenbanks. By legend this was the oldest Lower Skagit village. Post-contact, it was considered a Snohomish camp. There was a portage here between present Saratoga Passage and Admiralty Inlet.  (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

20. SHET’LH-shet-lhuts (‘burnt leaves’). Snohomish. W side Whidbey Island at Bush Point at base of spit. Three houses about 50’x16’ and potlatch house located further out on spit reported here mid-1800s. Also cemetery.  (7)

 

 

 

 

 

 

21. D’GWAD’wk (‘in the basket’, or alternatively, 'lots of a certain species of crabs'). Snohomish. Lower Whidbey Island on the spit at E side of Cultus Bay. An important early village site that was the center for the island Snohomish. Potlatch house here attended on occasion by Duwamish and Suquamish as well. Five longhouses reported here early-mid 1800s. A stone fence was built on the spit about 1850 to prevent erosion. The village abandoned about 1870 when residents relocated to Tulalip. Two cemeteries here. A s’doh-HOHBSH band village.  (7, 9)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

22. TSEHT-skluhks (‘ragged nose’). Snohomish. On Whidbey Island E of present town of Langley at Sandy Point. Village with potlatch house which drew visitors from as far away as Samish. Clam beds nearby.  (7)

 

 

 

 

 

 

23. WHESH-ud (‘splashing water’). Snohomish. On Camano Island at Camano Head. A village was said to have been here before the great slide of 1825 in which a substantial portion of the Head slid into present Possession Sound. After that time this area was avoided by the older people except for seasonal clamming. A s’doh-HOHBSH band village.  (7)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

24. tw’TOE-hob. Snohomish. On mainland S of mouth of Stillaguamish River and about one mile N of present town of Warm Beach.  (7)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

25. [name not known]. [pre-contact] Stillaguamish, [post-contact] Snohomish. On mainland, S of mouth of Stillaguamish River at present town of Warm Beach. Two houses here and cabins for visitors in mid-1800s. One chief here was called Zis-a-ba.  (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

26. [name not known]. Stillaguamish. Near S mouth of Stillaguamish River (here called Hat Slough) about 4 miles S of present town of Stanwood. It contained 2 large houses sheltering possibly 100 people in early-mid 1800s. According to some reports residents here were called kwats-AH’kw-beewh  or Quadsak   This may have been home to Chief Quil-Que-Kadam.  (1, 7, 8)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

27. [name not known]. Stillaguamish. On Stillaguamish River at or near present town of Florence. Reportedly had 3 potlatch houses. Tract containing village was homesteaded by settler John Silva.  (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

28. [name uncertain, possibly SKAY-wuks or sehl-TAHCH]. Stillaguamish. On Stillaguamish River at or near present town of Stanwood. Three large houses with an estimated 250 people reportedly living here. Probably mid-1800s the chief here was named Sa-Quil-Ten.  (1)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

29. aht-sah-LAY-dee. Lower Skagit. Camano Island at Utsalady Bay. Village occupied by Kikiallus group.  (1, 6) About midway down the west side of Camano Island at the site of the present-day village of Camano was another pre-contact village called oo-WAY-los. (9)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

1.  "Commission Findings on the Coast Salish and western Washington Indians" by Indian Claims Commission in Coast Salish and Western Washington Indians, v.5.  New York:  Garland Publishing, 1974.

2.  "Central Coast Salish" by Wayne Suttles in Handbook of North American Indians, Northwest Coast, v.7.  Washington DC:  Smithsonian Institution Press, 1990.

3.  "Chemakum" by William W. Elmendorf in Handbook of North American Indians, Northwest Coast, v.7.  Washington DC:  Smithsonian Institution Press, 1990.

4.  "The Structure of Twana Culture" by W. W. Elmendorf in Coast Salish and Western Washington Indians, v.4.  New York:  Garland Publishing, 1974.

5.  Duwamish et al vs. United States of America, F-275.  Washington DC:  US Court of Claims, 1927.

6.  "The Coast Salish of Puget Sound" by Marian W. Smith in American Anthropologist, v. 43 [new series]: 197-211, 1941.

7.  "Historical and Ethnological Study of the Snohomish Indian People" by Colin E. Tweddell in Coast Salish and Western Washington Indians, v.2.  New York:  Garland Publishing, 1974.

8.  Indian Stories and Legends of the Stillaguamish, Sauks, and Allied Tribes by Nels Bruseth, Fairfield [WA]:  Ye Galleon Press, 1977.

9.  "Puget Sound Geography" by T. T. Waterman.  Washington DC:  National Anthropological Archives, mss.